P-61 Black Widow Aircraft Model

SKU: 7MMNC9103
Stock: 2
Price: $169.00
$119.00

Qty: - +
Shipping - Continental USA: $20.00
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P-61 Black Widow Model Aircraft

This P-61 Black Widow model aircraft is actually crafted by hand from solid philippian mahogany. Following many hours that are expended making the fuselage and affixing the wings and armament, the plane model is then painted by hand and airbrushed with the actual insignias and call signs that had been on the original aircraft. The model planes are then clear coated to protect them for a multitude of generations to come. All this effort and detail for market for virtually 50 % of the actual list selling price!

These remarkable top quality solid hard wood airplane models are absolutely not like there plastic relatives. These plane models are exhibited and treasured around the world.

Your family and co-workers are going to always be in amazement of the actual aircraft models look and detail. This particular model is not a plaything but can be admired by all. With this particular size aircraft model you can easily present it for all to see on your desktop or mantel. You can even rig the model in order to suspend from the ceiling in your residence or workplace!Don't miss out attain yours right now! We can not offer these kinds of plane models for these super very low prices forever!

Our aircraft models are packed with care to arrive in excellent shape. We surround the scale models with foam and double box them to arrive in as constructed condition. After arriving it takes less than ten minutes to get your aircraft model ready to show off. All our packages are transported insured for extra protection in case of a mishap while in transit to you our customer. This complete order process and shipment requires about a week for you to get our model in hand after filling out our secure online order form.

Wingspan: 12.5"
Length: 9.25"

Scale: 1/48th

Includes Deskstand

 

History:


The Northrop P-61 Black Widow was the first operational U.S. military aircraft designed specifically to use radar

The "Black Widow" was an all-metal, twin-engine, twin-boom, aircraft flown as a night-fighter by United States Army Air Forces squadrons in the European Theater, the Pacific Theater, the CBI Theater, and the Mediterranean Theater during World War II. It replaced earlier British-designed night-fighter aircraft that had been updated to incorporate radar when it became available. On the night of 14 August 1945, a P-61B-2 of the 548th NFS named "Lady in the Dark" was unofficially credited with the last allied air victory before VJ Day. The P-61 was also modified to create the F-15 Reporter, the last piston-powered photo-reconnaissance aircraft designed and produced for the U.S. Air Force.

Although not produced in the large numbers of its contemporaries, the Black Widow was effectively operated as a night-fighter by United States Army Air Forces squadrons in the European Theater, the Pacific Theater, the China Burma India Theater and the Mediterranean Theater during World War II. It replaced earlier British-designed night-fighter aircraft that had been updated to incorporate radar when it became available. After the war, the P-61 served in the United States Air Force as a long-range, all weather, day/night interceptor for Air Defense Command until 1948, and Fifth Air Force until 1950.

On the night of 14 August 1945, a P-61B of the 548th Night Fight Squadron named "Lady in the Dark" was unofficially credited with the last Allied air victory before VJ Day. The P-61 was also modified to create the F-15 Reporter photo-reconnaissance aircraft for the United States Air Force.

In August 1940, 16 months before the United States entered the war, the U.S. Air Officer in London, Lieutenant General Delos C. Emmons, was briefed on British research in RADAR (Radio Detection and Ranging), which had been underway since 1936 and had played an important role in the nation's defense against the Luftwaffe during the Battle of Britain. General Emmons was informed of the new Airborne Intercept radar (AI for short), a self-contained unit that could be installed in an aircraft and allow it to operate independently of ground stations. In September 1940, the Tizard Mission traded British research on many aspects including radar for American production.

Simultaneously, the British Purchasing Commission evaluating US aircraft declared their urgent need for a high-altitude, high-speed aircraft to intercept the Luftwaffe bombers attacking London at night. The aircraft would need to patrol continuously over the city throughout the night, requiring at least an eight-hour loiter capability. The aircraft would carry one of the early (and heavy) AI radar units, and mount its specified armament in "multiple-gun turrets". The British conveyed the requirements for a new fighter to all the aircraft designers and manufacturers they were working with. Jack Northrop was among them, and he realized that the speed, altitude, fuel load and multiple-turret requirements demanded a large aircraft with multiple engines.

General Emmons returned to the U.S. with details of the British night-fighter requirements, and in his report said that US aircraft design bureaus possibly could produce such an aircraft. The Emmons Board developed basic requirements and specifications, handing them over towards the end of 1940 to Air Technical Service Command, Wright Field. After considering the two biggest challenges—the high weight of the AI radar and the very long (by fighter standards) loiter time of eight hours minimum—the board, like Jack Northrop, realized the aircraft would need the considerable power and resulting size of twin engines, and recommended such parameters.

 

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